Site Infrastructure Documentation

Having a proper IT infrastructure and network layout is crucial for most businesses but operates in the background. For Shackleton, understanding how it's mapped out is fundamental to the services we provide.

Utilising world class software tools, we meticulously list and document every item and every aspect of your network. This means we can see what is on your network and where it is located, making it easier for us to fix problems remotely.

Site documentation at this level allows us to be more efficient, not just in fixing issues but in locating essential information, (i.e. names and passwords for routers, firewalls, managed switches etc.). All this information is retained within our highly secure software.

And that’s the key to proper site documentation; being able to find information quickly, that is up to date and accurate.

Shackleton uses best-in-class IT software specifically designed to securely store site documentation. This means our Service Delivery Team are able to respond to client queries almost immediately and fix most issues first time.

Effective IT infrastructure documentation enables us to be organised, efficient and methodical in the way we receive, handle and satisfy client queries and issues. it’s all part of the service!

Please, get in touch to find out more about how your network could be managed.

blinking eye with European Union iris

8 November 2018

GDPR: It’s real, it’s expensive and it applies to you too

The hype surrounding GDPR has died down since go-live – but there are warning signs that the ICO is cracking down.

windows products circling round onscreen.

2 November 2018

Why you need professional help when Windows updates

The latest Windows 10 update has caused a lot of unexpected problems – you need professional assistance to avoid them.

animated motherboard

19 October 2018

From ‘The Apprentice’ to IT Technician

It’s been 3 months since Morgan came to Shackleton from an Apprentice IT engineering role at St Andrews University, where he was part of a 100-strong team supporting students, academics and support staff who, in the main, were using identical systems.